Running a whole country may not be easy for the newly crowned King Charles III, but it definitely has undeniable perks that will truly make him feel like the ultimate royal.

Following the 73-year-old King's accession to the throne on Sept.10, he would now partake in a bigger responsibility as the leader of Great Britain's people. According to the Institute for Government, King Charles would now be handling the opening of the parliament, appointing ministers, approving legislation, and conducting weekly meetings with the prime ministers. This is why he would need all the help he could get to still enjoy his title as a royal while feeling comfortable, presentable and relaxed.

Here are 12 of the craziest perks King Charles would now receive as the head of the royals, according to Reader's Digest.

1. Having hand-washed clothes

King Charles III and Queen Consort Camilla's clothing come with a hefty price tag, so they need to be hand-washed all the time. The royal couple's clothes are not allowed to be cleaned by a washing machine. The source alleged that the last time clothes have been sent away to be cleaned, some clothing items were "kept as souvenirs."

2. Having ironed shoelaces

A King always has to look prim and proper, which is why the royal has a designated server responsible for maintaining his wardrobe and picking out his outfits. One of the etiquette rules requires having ironed shoelaces. Thus, the King has at least three personal valets to iron every shoelace in each pair of shoes he owns.

3. The potatoes are measured

The royals have a reputation for looking well-organized all the time, may it be in events or during mealtime. Interestingly, presentation matters even on the dinner plate since every potato served is measured at Buckingham Place, so the dimensions appear similar.

4. Having a personal alarm clock

The late Queen Elizabeth II had a piper player play Scottish bagpipes under her window each morning from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m., which is a privilege King Charles may also inherit if he opts to.

5. No cornered sandwiches

If you're a royal fanatic, then you'd know that sandwiches served to the royal family always have rounded edges. Why? According to Reader's Digest, there had been a long-standing rumor that Prince Albert, the husband of the late Queen Victoria of Great Britain and Ireland, believed it was "unlucky" to eat anything shaped similarly to a coffin.

6. Driving without a license

King Charles may have a chauffeur of his own to drive him anywhere in the city, but if ever he would like to drive on his own, he wouldn't need a driver's license in the U.K.

7. Having a personal toothbrush squeezer

King Charles allegedly needed help with his nighttime routine at one point in time. The source claimed that the King's valet, Michael Fawcett, would "squeeze toothpaste" onto his toothbrush every night.

8. Having warm biscuits

The monarch prefers that his biscuits kept at a certain temperature before having his favorite cheese and biscuit combination after his meals. The staff apparently "keeps a warming pan" to ensure that the biscuits are to the King's liking.

9. Having everything paid for by the state

The King's work is funded by the Sovereign Grant, a system of funding that covers royal travels, communications and information, as well as the maintenance of the royal palace. It is often an annual grant reviewed by the Royal Trustees every five years, according to the royal family's official website.

10. Having no IDs

Police officers are reportedly not allowed to ask the King for any identification card since it is not required for him to have one.

11. The King can ban humor

Once King Charles dies, the people of Great Britain are "banned" from being funny on public television. The source revealed that the broadcasting company the BBC is not allowed to air "anything humorous" during the 12-day period of the monarch's death until his funeral to pay their respects.

12. The King is allowed to sail ships

Like his beloved mother, Queen Elizabeth, King Charles has the right to commandeer any ship owned by the British.